Category Archives: Blog

Now Doctors Are Prescribing Walks In The Park To Get Us Off Our Butts

GUESS what doctors are NOW prescribing to their patients? Hint BARTENDAZ told you movement is medicine. – MIND UP!

By Ben Schiller

Get outside already. With Park Rx, it’s what the doctor ordered.

When Dr. Robert Zarr wants to help kids with obesity and diabetes in Washington D.C., he doesn’t just order in another set of pills. He looks up a database of green spaces and asks his patients if they’ve been outside recently. Then he writes a prescription–to a park.

Over the last three years, Zarr has been chief evangelist for Park Rx, a system that makes it easier for doctors to recommend outdoor activity, offering an alternative or supplement to drug treatments.

“We wanted to know whether actually prescribing a park during a doctor’s visit would change behavior.”

With the help of the National Park Service, the D.C. Department of Parks and Recreationand other groups, Zarr mapped and rated 380 parks for their activities, cleanliness, safety, and accessibility to transit. Now when DC’s doctors look up a patient’s electronic record, they can see a database of greenery alongside other options. They can ask patients about their physical activity and what they like doing, then print out a page with details of a nearby park with a map and picture.

Continue reading

6 Snack Habits for Healthy Weight Loss

What is your favorite HEALTHY snack? Look at this list and let us know if your choice made the cut. – MIND UP!

By David Zinczenko

Snacks, finger foods, tapas, amuse-bouche — however you term them, there’s something endlessly satisfying about munching on little hand-held bites of heaven. Problem is, America’s favorite snacks aren’t little, nor are they heavenly. In fact, a recent study in the journal Hepatology found that 27 percent of kids’ diets come from high-fat, high-sugar snacks, and the frequent grazing is directly linked to belly fat accumulation. Fortunately, there’s also research to suggest we can snack smartly — and slim down. Here are six tips that will help you Eat It to Beat It! Snack-tastic!

healthy snack

Continue reading

What Your Poop Says About Your Health

The body has WISDOM. LEARN to see the signs your body sends. THIS eye opening clip will surely have you thinking. READ and share your thoughts. MIND UP!

By JULIE STEWART

golden-toilet

Next to sex, few bodily functions are as private as pooping. For example, you’ve no doubt driven past a guy who pulled over to take a leak, but we’re betting the only guy you’ve seen squatting on the shoulder was changing his tire.

Continue reading

Sugar Wise: How Fruits Stack Up

Too MUCH of ANYTHING can be bad for you. Do you know which fruit contains the most natural sugar? Take a minute to reflect then click the link below and see if your pick was #1. – MIND UP!

By Caitlin Covington

fruitplate_810

Strawberries, bananas, oranges, kiwi… the list goes on and on. Fruit is touted as a super-healthy snack option, but while the fiber and other nutrients found in fruit are a great part of any diet, many varieties can also be very high in sugar. And too much sugar, regardless of where it comes from, can have some seriously negative effects. (Yep, even if that sugar is from fruit!) Does this mean run from the produce aisle screaming? Definitely not. But it might be smart to keep an eye on fruit-based sugar consumption.

Continue reading

15 Natural Back Pain Remedies

Do YOU suffer from back pain? If so LOOK at this article and learn natural remedies to soothe your vertebrae. – MIND UP!

By Christine Mattheis, Health.com

yoga-back-pain-story-top

(Health.com) – Achy back? You’re not alone: back problems send more Americans to the doctor annually than nearly any other medical problem, according to a 2013 Mayo Clinic study. Whether you’re recovering from misjudging a heavy load (we’ve all been there), dealing with a lingering injury, or have a chronic problem, you don’t necessarily need to resort to popping tons of pain relievers. Talk to your doc about these 15 expert-approved natural back pain remedies, and find out if they are safe and appropriate for you.

Continue reading

How To Make Exercise Fun

FUNdamental, FUNctional movement. READ below to understand why having FUN is so important to your workout. – MIND UP!

By STEPHEN GUISE

“Fitness needs to be perceived as fun and games or we subconsciously avoid it.”

Alan Thicke

Do you find exercise to be fun, boring, or miserable?
If it’s one of the latter two, you’ve come to the right place.
The popular way to make exercise fun is through competition, such as sports. Sports are great, but not all people enjoy them or can physically play them. How can they make exercise more fun?
Continue reading

“We Have Designed Cities To Make People Ill”

Do you believe cities were PURPOSELY designed to make us ILL? Well SEE what this world famous architect has to say about it. MIND UP!

By Slicker City

AT THE AIA CONVENTION IN CHICAGO, PROFESSOR THOMAS FISHER ENTREATS ARCHITECTS TO “TAKE RESPONSIBILITY” FOR DESIGNING HEALTHIER SPACES.

“We are all suffering from the bad design in the world,” Thomas Fisher, an architecture professor and dean of the University of Minnesota‘s design college, declared at a panel at the American Institute of Architects convention in Chicago yesterday. Fisher was part of a discussion on the link between public health and architecture with Heather R. Britt and Jess Roberts of Allina Health, a Minnesota-based not-for-profit health care system.

Continue reading

10 Timeless Fitness Laws

A list of 10 TIMELESS fitness laws. Can you guess how many of these laws are in BARTENDAZ natural movement system? – MIND UP!

In an age of whiz-bang techno-training, it’s way too easy to lose track of what made us fit in the first place: quality movement, good food, and high-intensity common sense.

By PAM FOXX

In the not-so-distant past, your food grew on a farm. Meals were home-cooked (on an actual fire, in an actual stove). The outdoors was your gym. Watches? They tracked time, not activity. Blue light, texting neck, and the masses getting supersized by McDonald’s were issues for a future generation. Yet somewhere along the way, conventional wisdom got muddled with modern mechanisms. And the results weren’t pretty. We became much more sedentary and got fatter. And slower. And weaker (seriously). At the table, our food began to look less and less like it ever came from the ground. “Western society is the most overfed but malnourished, sick society due to the imbalance of physical activity and real nourishment, says Stacy Sims, MSc, Ph.D., co-founder of Osmo Nutrition. “The body is designed to move all the time and use food that supports health, not quick hits of ‘feel good’ sugar and fat.” So how do we go back? By homing in on the fundamentals and returning to the principles that have stood the test of time. Here, 10 laws of fitness your grandfather would approve of.

#1: Perfect the Pushup

When Charles Atlas promised the men of America that he’d transform them from weaklings into masses of muscle, the fitness industry was forever changed. But “Dynamic Tension”—for all its faults—also had its strengths. It was a program based on the basics: bodyweight. As the legend goes, Atlas studied lions, noticing that animals had no exercise equipment. They had no gyms. Instead, they pitted one muscle against another. And dropping down and giving 10—or 20 or 50—should still have its place in your routine. “With proper form, your pushups and pull-ups are still the best exercises you can do. They engage your core with a functional push-pull action,” says Sims.

#2: Do It Right—or Stop Doing It

Focus on form. If your technique is all wrong, you might be doing more harm than good. Why? Misalignment means the biomechanics of movement are out of whack.  The result: increased stress in different joints and potential muscle imbalances—the perfect setup for overuse, chronic pain, and injury, Sims says. But mastering the “how to” isn’t all about taking preventative measures. “The other aspect of proper form is that you end up using the smaller, stabilizing muscles giving you core stability for daily movement,” Sims explains. And if you’re engaging your muscles all day—with good posture (yes, you really should pull your shoulders back), or by perfecting a pushup—you’re building core strength without realizing it. Slouched over, resting on your elbows, back twisted? It should be no surprise that you make grandpa noises when getting up from your chair.

#3: Drink, Baby, Drink

Athletes have been around far longer than Gatorade and the new class of beverages strewn across supermarket shelves (ones that promise to replenish, hydrate, and boost performance). And when a run was no more than a run, athletes didn’t swear by high-concentration sugary liquids. When a workout isn’t long enough or intense enough to result in severe fatigue, plain old water works, says Matt Fitzgerald, sports nutritionist, and author of thebook Diet Cults. “In fact, it’s not necessary to drink anything in most workouts lasting less than an hour,” he adds. That’s not to say that drink scientists aren’t onto something: “You need a small amount of sodium to actually pull water into the body,” says Sims. That’s why low-concentration approaches (Nuun, SOS, and Sims’ OSMO) have become popular.

#4: Eat a Quality Breakfast

Rising with the sun means more hours to move and more hours to eat well. “One of the overlooked benefits of eating breakfast is that it provides an early and additional opportunity to make progress toward meeting daily quotas for high-quality food types such as vegetables and fruit,” says Fitzgerald. It’s not hard to start knocking out nutritional requirements before your day begins either—one serving of vegetables or fresh berries added to whole-grain cereal—can make all the difference, says Fitzgerald. Just remember composition, says Sims. A croissant and a coffee won’t cut it: “You wake up with high levels of cortisol (the belly fat hormone), and adding sugar and caffeine will perpetuate cortisol’s actions,” she says.

#5: Repeat After Us (One More Time): I Will Eat Real Food

You won’t find the recipe for a healthy diet on the back of a package. Change the way a food naturally exists, and you change the way your body absorbs it. “There is a disconnect between the marketing claims of pre-packaged food and real food made from scratch. And food can’t just be reduced to single compounds,” says says Allen Lim, Ph.D., founder of Skratch Labs. To that extent, Fitzgerald has spent time analyzing world-class endurance athletes—a group as fit and healthy as any population on earth—finding a simple trend: “what I call ‘agnostic healthy eating,’” he says. What that means: eating inculturally normal ways, but not avoiding food groups entirely; filling meals with vegetables, fruit, nuts and seeds, fish and high-quality meat, whole grains, and dairy; and only sparingly eating low-quality refined grains, processed meat, and sweets. “If this formula is good enough for athletes who place tremendous demands on their bodies, it’s good enough for us,” he says.

#6: Feel Your Way to Faster

The most sophisticated and reliable fitness monitoring device that exists—or will ever exist—isn’t a device at all: it’s your brain, says Fitzgerald. “If your body needs rest, your brain will communicate that to your conscious awareness in the form of feelings of fatigue and low motivation,” he explains. The symptom: a greater perceived effort: “If the body is fatigued or if its performance capacity is compromised, the brain will have to work harder to get the same level of output, and the greater the effort the exerciser will perceive.” On the other hand? If your body is responding well to your training and is ready for more hard work, your brain will let you know that too in no uncertain terms, Fitzgerald says.

#7: Lighten Up and Have Some Fun

“The more you enjoy your training, the more you’ll put into it,” says Fitzgerald. “And the more you put into it, the more you’ll get out of it.” The research agrees: Your best efforts will likely come when you’re having the most fun, a 2012 study by Alan St. Clair Gibson of the University of Worcester found. Find something you like and the addiction will come naturally: “Research indicates that the association of ‘fun’ with things you do perpetuates stress release, making you want to go back for more,” says Sims.

#8: Recover. No, Really: RECOVER.

One of the problems with the evolution of cross-training is that you can go hard every day. The problem: That’s not what your body needs. The key is finding an easy-hard cycle you can give into, says Michael Joyner, M.D., and physiologist and anesthesiologist at the Mayo Clinic. “People have forgotten to make the hard days harder and the easy days easier.” Think in terms of “active rest”—a 3- or 4-mile run for a distance runner, calisthenics, jumping rope, or classic conditioning drills, Joyner says. “That’s really important.”

#9: It’s Not All About the Bike, the Shoes, or the Compression Underwear

Aerodynamics, biomechanics, breathability—they’re words that get a lot of ink (on labels, in magazines, and in the scripts of gear salespeople across the world). And yeah, tech has its perks. Breathable fabrics make long and hot hikes more bearable. But will your gear always make the difference? A recent University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill study found only 14 percent of runners who laced up in lightweight kicks reported injury in a year’s time; almost half of runners in traditional sneakers did. So plus one for minimalism? Not so fast. The same University of North Carolina research revealed that people who chose traditional shoes landed differently from those who donned the minimalist shoes (on their heel or mid-foot versus on their forefoot). The point: Everyone is different. And gear that works is subjective. “Good gear makes things more enjoyable, and most importantly prevents injury,” says Sims. So don’t skimp on no-brainers: proper bike fit, shoes, and protective items—but don’t become slaves to them.

#10: Never Stop Moving

Take this in the most expansive and philosophical way: Build movement into all aspects of your life—work, home, play—and throughout your life. You name the disease and exercise is the cure. “It’s proven to reduce the likelihood of weight gain, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, liver disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s, osteoporosis, sexual dysfunction, and a host of infectious diseases,” says Fitzgerald. Work out, and not only will you be healthier, but happier, more confident, and (bonus!) smarter, Fitzgerald adds.

4 surprising benefits of vegetables

The benefits of eating vegetables explained in this video. CHECK it out and share your thoughts on CNN’s findings. – MIND UP!

By The Nutrition Twins, Special to CNN

Editor’s note: Lyssie Lakatos and Tammy Lakatos Shames, also known as The Nutrition Twins, are registered dietitians, personal trainers and authors of “The Nutrition Twins’ Veggie Cure.” Connect with them on NutritionTwins.comPinterestTwitter and Facebook.

(CNN) – You’ve seen Meatless Mondays, vegan restaurants and green drinks become all the rage. You know that vegetables can help you lose weight and fend off chronic diseases. Yet if you’re like most Americans, you probably still aren’t eating enough of them.

If you need a little motivation to get your share, here are four surprising reasons to increase your vegetable intake:

1. They fight bloat

Although you may associate vegetables with creating a bloated belly, most vegetables actually do the opposite. Vegetables are rich in fiber, which flushes out waste and gastric irritants and prevents constipation by keeping the digestive tract moving.

Vegetables can also help you look leaner by counteracting bloat caused by salt. Most American adults get nearly twice the recommended sodium limit. Eating a bacon and egg biscuit, a typical restaurant meal, or instant soup means consuming nearly an entire day’s sodium allotment. Vegetables are rich in both potassium and water, which help flush excess sodium out of the body while restoring the body’s normal fluid balance.

To ease that full feeling in your stomach, try eating fennel, cucumbers, summer squash, romaine lettuce, red leaf lettuce or tomatoes.

If you experience gas when you start to add more fiber and vegetables to your diet, choose steamed vegetables rather than raw ones. The heat from cooking breaks down some of the fiber and will keep gastric distress to a minimum as your body adjusts to consuming the fiber you need.

5 ways to flatten your belly (no crunches needed)

2. They create a youthful glow

Want younger-looking skin? Vegetables prevent unwanted signs of aging and keep skin young and supple thanks to phytonutrients, vitamin C and high water content.

Many vegetables are 85% to 95% water, which helps hydrate the skin and reduce wrinkles. And phytonutrients, found in all vegetables, can guard against premature aging by preventing cell damage from stress, the sun, pollution and other environmental toxins. Vitamin C aids in collagen formation, according to studies.

Choose brightly colored red and orange vegetables and you’ll get an added boost of beta carotene, which can give you a healthy glow as it protects skin from sun damage. Similarly, lycopene, found in red vegetables such as tomatoes, also has been shown to act as a natural sunscreen.

6 common sun myths exposed

Eat vegetables like tomatoes, cucumbers, bell peppers, broccoli and potatoes for vitamin C, and carrots, sweet potatoes, butternut squash and other orange produce for beta carotene.

3. They reduce stress

Stress can make you tired and moody, hindering your ability to make healthy nutrition choices. The result is emotional overeating and binges.

Meanwhile, nutrients like magnesium and vitamin C are quickly depleted during stressful times. Luckily, many vegetables contain these very nutrients, as well as tension-reducing omega-3 fatty acids and B vitamins that fight anxiety and depression.

The potassium and magnesium found in some vegetables can also calm you on the inside as they relax blood vessels and keep your blood pressure down, according to research. And fiber keeps blood sugar levels stable, preventing dips in energy and the associated mood swings.

To reduce stress, eat any vegetable. Mushrooms, leafy greens, squash, potatoes, bell peppers, spinach, bok choy, fennel, string beans and edamame are especially good sources of several vitamins and minerals.

For a no-fuss way to consume more vegetables and combat stress, add leafy greens, mushrooms and peppers to your sandwiches, wraps, soups, pizza, tomato sauce and omelets.

Destress your life in 10 easy steps

4. They protect your bones

Most people think of dairy foods as the bone protectors, thanks to their high calcium and vitamin D content. But some vegetables also have these same nutrients in addition to bone-building vitamin K, magnesium, potassium and prebiotic fiber.

Tomatoes in particular have recently been connected to bone health.A study found that when you remove lycopene-rich foods like tomatoes from the diet, women are at increased risk of osteoporosis.

Eat strong-spined, dark leafy greens like collard greens, turnip greens, kale, spinach (cooked for more calcium!), broccoli and green peas for calcium and vitamin K. Mushrooms contain vitamin D while asparagus, chard, kale, artichokes, onions, garlic and leeks are full of prebiotic fiber.

Tips to keep your bones healthy